Attractions You Have To See

These Are TheJohannesburg Attractions You Have To See

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Art galleries throughout the city display an array of contemporary and traditional African artwork. For extra entertainment, lifestyle parks like GOG Lifestyle Park and Indoor Trampoline Parkz provide additional experiences.

Constitution Hill offers an enthralling perspective of both old and new Jo’burg, including its landmarks – such as the Constitutional Court defending human rights; and Number Four Prison where Nelson Mandela and Mohandas Gandhi spent time. Guided tours are also available right after your Cathay Pacific flight taking you from Tokyo to Johannesburg.

Apartheid Museum

The Apartheid Museum should be on everyone’s itinerary when visiting Johannesburg. This museum vividly documents South Africa’s apartheid era and subsequent campaign to end segregation through artifacts, photographs and chilling personal accounts displayed across exhibition areas. Furthermore, Nelson Mandela was honored for his contributions as the country’s first black president – it is easy to spend several hours here!

Experienced museum tour guides provide an enlightening, but sobering, experience for their guests, especially children who may otherwise remain ignorant about past struggles that their country endured. Bring them along if possible so they can learn about this important part of history firsthand from experienced guides who can enlighten and educate.

The museum serves as an important vehicle to promote racial tolerance and reconciliation by inviting visitors to take a stone from one pile at the entrance and put it on another on the opposite side. By doing this, they pledge to fight racism wherever it may exist.

Visitors looking for another perspective of apartheid may also tour one of South Africa’s oldest and most historic townships: Soweto was home to Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu – both icons in their respective fields – making a visit there worthwhile with stops at Mandela House, Constitutional Court (South Africa’s highest judicial court), Old Fort Prison (where both Mandela and Gandhi spent time incarcerated), Constitutional Court and Old Fort Prison among others.

Alexandra Museum of Contemporary Art in Alexandra Township is an essential destination for fans of African art. Boasting an expansive collection of African arts and crafts as well as serving local coffee, guests can also check out its contemporary exhibitions.

Looking for something less somber can explore Soweto’s vibrant entertainment scene or stroll through Maboneng Precinct, known for its boutique shops and creative flair. Other highlights include Soweto Towers which were originally cooling towers for power stations but have since been converted to offer extreme sports thrills such as world’s highest bungee jump between two towers.

Market Theatre Complex

Johannesburg’s rich history can be found everywhere; from its gold rush era roots to its turbulent legacy of apartheid and resistance. A half-day walking tour with Joburg Places (550 rand) leads visitors through Gandhi Square and Nelson Mandela’s old law offices – which served as his office prior to becoming President and leader against apartheid emancipation efforts in South Africa.

The Market Theatre Complex in bohemian Newtown opened in 1976 as an independent, anti-racist theatre during South Africa’s apartheid regime. Dubbed after its former market tenant, this defied legislation known as Group Areas Act which restricted theatre attendance to white people only; and was home to such notable actors as Athol Fugard, Leon Gluckman and Nadine Gordimer.

Today, the theater receives government funds and operates in collaboration with other organizations to host plays and concerts. Its main stage, known as John Kani Theatre today, was named for a prominent South African performer while Laager Theatre resembles an improvised military camp used to protect those within it from outside threats.

The Cradle of Humankind, located just an hour’s drive from Johannesburg, is a UNESCO World Heritage site where fossils of early hominids have been unearthed. Here visitors can participate in interactive exhibits and tours through Sterkfontein Caves where many discoveries were made – like Little Foot a nearly complete skeleton dating back over three million years!

Walter Sisulu Botanical Garden provides an enjoyable nature experience, featuring waterfalls and breeding Verreaux’s Eagles. As one of the country’s ten botanical gardens, free entrance and guided tours are provided here.

Johannesburg Art Gallery stands as an artistic hub in Johannesburg and showcases both traditional and contemporary African artworks from Joubert Park venue designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens in 1923, which also houses a museum, bakery and Turkish restaurant.

Mandela House

Mandela House was situated in Orlando West and served as the first home for former South African President and anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela, built as a small red-brick “matchbox” house in 1946. Here he resided with Evelyn Ntoko Mase until their divorce in 1957; upon marrying Winnie Madikizela-Mandela the following year, Mandela rarely visited as his anti-apartheid activities increased, even fuel bombing or burning incidents took place several times during that period – making this place his initial residence before being immersed into anti-apartheid activities that became so ingrained within South African politics during that period of its construction and use!

House now serves as a museum that gives visitors a glimpse into former president Nelson Mandela’s life and presidency, when he worked tirelessly to end apartheid and foster racial reconciliation. Featuring personal belongings of Mandela himself as well as letters and notes from friends and family as well as honorary doctorates awarded by universities worldwide, this museum serves as a testament to Mandela and the struggles of his people – it even features his personal belongings!

This museum provides guided tours of Mandela’s house and various exhibits detailing his fight for freedom. Anyone wanting to gain more insight into Johannesburg history and Nelson Mandela should not miss this experience!

It’s also an invaluable place for learning the history of South African democracy, with exhibits depicting struggles that the black community under apartheid had to face and how these efforts led to democracy’s establishment in South Africa. Open from 9 am to 5 pm from Monday through Friday from 9 am, entrance costs R60 for South African citizens/residents; R20 is charged for children aged under 12.

Mandela House lies about 27 kilometers southwest of Johannesburg city center and can easily be accessed either through self-drive, public transit, minibus taxis, the Gautrain or tour buses. Also nearby is Hector Pieterson Museum which gives tourists an understanding of Soweto’s struggles from an historical standpoint.

Walter Sisulu Botanical Garden

The Walter Sisulu Botanical Garden (previously Witwatersrand National Botanical Gardens) is one of Johannesburg’s most beloved public parks and an excellent getaway from urban living. Offering tranquil settings with hundreds of indigenous plant species as well as wildlife such as mongooses and otters, as well as sprawling lawns ideal for picnicking or relaxing, its peacefulness makes this an excellent place for recreation or simply strolling leisurely through. Pave paths lead through themed gardens where ancient African plants like Cycad Garden; succulent Rockery where aloes grow; or search through themed gardens where ancient African plants such as Cycad Garden or Succulent Rockery where aloes can be found. At its center lies Witpoortjie Waterfall where two Verreaux’s Eagles nest on its cliffs alongside this watercourse!

Malcolm Road in Roodepoort hosts this park located approximately 30km west of Johannesburg’s central city area and features ample free parking on site, making it accessible via both bus and rail transport services.

Visits to the garden are especially enjoyable in spring and summer when many shrubs and flowers are in full bloom, though any time of year is worthwhile. In wintertime the garden offers several events, such as its Spring Fair with thousands of indigenous plants for sale as well as their Winter Picnic Concert series on alternate Sunday afternoons featuring classical and jazz music. Guided walks are offered both daytime and evening walks along with geological trails that reveal more about its rich geological makeup.

The gardens are open daily and admission is free; however a donation is recommended. A variety of facilities is offered such as an onsite restaurant, children’s playground and botanical nursery selling South African native plants. It is also possible to bring your own picnic or snack for enjoyment on one of their expansive lawns; and don’t forget the large dam/wetland area with 226 bird species that have been recorded nearby! They even boast an impressive bird hide for visitors looking to spot some rare ones amongst them all!

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